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solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.
solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.
solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.
solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.
solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.
solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.

solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(
Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!

Love your art, love yourself!

Best advice ever. Also, practice. Practice lots because that helps your confidence too.

le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.
le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.
le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.
le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.
le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.
le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.
You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.

le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.

You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on antialiasing.

Bold by me for emphasis. Add it to the list of convenient colouring methods folks.

le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.
le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)
Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.
Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.
But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.
Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.
Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.
Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.

le-mec:

Deluxe Draughtsmanship Exercise CheetSheet(TM donut steel all rights reserved lol no not really)

Draughtsmanship is the skill of making lines go where you want them to go. For that, body, eyes and mind must work together.

Some movements feel awkward and your pen won’t go in the direction you want it to. That’s a body problem. Exercises like the radial and (clockwise/counterclockwise) circular training will help you build muscle memory.

But round arcs and straight lines are of no use if they don’t land on target. For that, practice three-point targeted circle exercises, circle push and ellipse exercises.

Jumping the gap between 2D and 3D is going to be the hardest part. You have to train your eyes. The problem is that the page is flat and your eyes will see that. Eliminate all shadows with a well lit surface. Defocus your eyes, close one eye (or cover it) to defeat your depth perception so you can see INTO and draw INTO the page rather than ON the page. You have to push your lines AWAY from you or TOWARDS you.

Lastly, some of these exercises are meant to be DISRUPTIVE. They break routine and pattern and force you to keep your mind engaged instead of falling into stupid autopilot mode. Good art requires a certain amount of mental fortitude. These exercises are meant to provide you with a level of cognitive difficulty to strain your mind.

Look at your own abilities (or lack of them), pick one to strengthen, and then choose the exercise that targets that weakness. Practice until it becomes second nature and then move on to the next weakness.

gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.
I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.
But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.
So my general process for using reference of any sort is:
loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.
…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.
It makes you a better artist. :)
-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.
gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.
I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.
But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.
So my general process for using reference of any sort is:
loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.
…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.
It makes you a better artist. :)
-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.
gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.
I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.
But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.
So my general process for using reference of any sort is:
loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.
…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.
It makes you a better artist. :)
-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.
gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.
I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.
But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.
So my general process for using reference of any sort is:
loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.
…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.
It makes you a better artist. :)
-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.
gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.
I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.
But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.
So my general process for using reference of any sort is:
loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.
…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.
It makes you a better artist. :)
-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.

gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.

I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.

But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.

So my general process for using reference of any sort is:

  1. loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
  2. research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
  3. studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
  4. go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.

…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.

It makes you a better artist. :)

-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.

Some beautiful commentary here, take the time to read through it all. Again, this is why proper referencing isn’t the same thing as tracing because you don’t just mindlessly clone your reference, you warp it and make it your own. They’re two very different things.

seerofsarcasm:

howtobeafuckinglady:

how come no one said anything about shape magazine lightening naomi?

image

unacceptable 

image

Holy shit they didn’t just lighten her, ive seen white girls with a heavier tan than this.

A wonderful example of just what Photoshop and digital editing can do to change how someone looks. This is a particularly triumphant example of bad editing. Here’s a short list the more obvious edits Shape made to her (without taking her initial makeup into account):

  • Lightening of her skin (probably already amplified by whatever ambient lighting was in the shot causing reflections). This has particularly unfortunate implications to boot due to the extent of the editing. Level correction is one thing, but this goes way beyond correction edits.
  • They’ved softened and blended her skin with some airbrushing. You can tell from how flat her cleavage appears because it no longer appears to sit in 3D space. Again, the lighting during the shot wouldn’t have helped either.
  • They’ve used the Liquify filter/tool here to thin her out. If you look at the outline of her body, especially on our left, you’ll notice how jagged it looks on the outside of her arm and her waist. The inside of her legs too are unnaturally thin for her proportion. The arm on our right also looks to have been shoved out of perspective for the same reason.
  • Again, more airbrushing on her face to erase any remaining creases etc.

Overall, those probably the most major changes done to her. If something’s on or in a magazine the odds are it’s had at least these edits done.

relissabt:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

Wisdom from talented fellow board artist Norm, for anyone curious what “gesture drawing” is really all about.

As with many things, simplicity is key. It’s an important basic skill to develop. Later, apply your gesture drawing skills to more finished drawings, you’ll find they have a lot more life!

Norm and his equally talented wife Griselda run their Tumblr together, check ‘em out!

sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!
sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People                    click and drag game
ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!
I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!

sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People
                    click and drag game

  • ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
  • if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!

I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!

lymantriidae:

skoothsmin:

digitonicelectronic:

glenkokoro:

artistresources:

EXTREMELY IN-DEPTH GUIDES TO DRAWING DIFFERENT ETHNICITIESPart 1Part 2Part 3 

I am just crying tears of happy joy and whispering GAIAONLINE TAKE NOTE

‘the Irish head (skull) is one of the largest in Europe’
‘Irish are broad built and large boned’
‘Irish have characteristically thick eyebrows’
whelp
guess I know what to blame my problems on
thanks genetics
but no this is a great resource totally rad check it out

This is really, really fascinating!

i’ve been waiting for this reference for a million years
lymantriidae:

skoothsmin:

digitonicelectronic:

glenkokoro:

artistresources:

EXTREMELY IN-DEPTH GUIDES TO DRAWING DIFFERENT ETHNICITIESPart 1Part 2Part 3 

I am just crying tears of happy joy and whispering GAIAONLINE TAKE NOTE

‘the Irish head (skull) is one of the largest in Europe’
‘Irish are broad built and large boned’
‘Irish have characteristically thick eyebrows’
whelp
guess I know what to blame my problems on
thanks genetics
but no this is a great resource totally rad check it out

This is really, really fascinating!

i’ve been waiting for this reference for a million years
lymantriidae:

skoothsmin:

digitonicelectronic:

glenkokoro:

artistresources:

EXTREMELY IN-DEPTH GUIDES TO DRAWING DIFFERENT ETHNICITIESPart 1Part 2Part 3 

I am just crying tears of happy joy and whispering GAIAONLINE TAKE NOTE

‘the Irish head (skull) is one of the largest in Europe’
‘Irish are broad built and large boned’
‘Irish have characteristically thick eyebrows’
whelp
guess I know what to blame my problems on
thanks genetics
but no this is a great resource totally rad check it out

This is really, really fascinating!

i’ve been waiting for this reference for a million years

lymantriidae:

skoothsmin:

digitonicelectronic:

glenkokoro:

artistresources:

EXTREMELY IN-DEPTH GUIDES TO DRAWING DIFFERENT ETHNICITIES
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3 

I am just crying tears of happy joy and whispering GAIAONLINE TAKE NOTE

‘the Irish head (skull) is one of the largest in Europe’

‘Irish are broad built and large boned’

‘Irish have characteristically thick eyebrows’

whelp

guess I know what to blame my problems on

thanks genetics

but no this is a great resource totally rad check it out

This is really, really fascinating!

i’ve been waiting for this reference for a million years

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