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Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Any tips on drawing mouths?

jazzumon:

gingeredpolarbears:

i-see-light:

Oh gosh I will try

I do basic closed mouths like

altered pretty easily for parted lips

annnnnd teeth…

You can put as much or as little definition into your teeth as you like, but I go about halfway

And remember that it’s dark inside mouths, and that there’s a tongue in there. I’m terrible at tips, I’m sorry! Polararts has a much better tutorial haha.

Naw, teeth are helpful~ I forgot to mention how to do those. xD

lmao no matter what you do dont ask me to explain this hehe

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language
We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.
by Amanda Patterson

This sheet can help just as much with character illustrations and the like. Body language is one of the hardest things to convey in a work and this has a nice selection if you get stuck.
amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language
We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.
by Amanda Patterson

This sheet can help just as much with character illustrations and the like. Body language is one of the hardest things to convey in a work and this has a nice selection if you get stuck.

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

This sheet can help just as much with character illustrations and the like. Body language is one of the hardest things to convey in a work and this has a nice selection if you get stuck.

shounen-shoujos:

shounen-shoujos:

sort of a guideline to purrfolks uwu hopefully this will help with “originality” issues more info can be found here !!

hello!! just reblogging to add this tidbit because seeing people tag this as reference is a little nerve-wracking.. i drew this sheet so that it’s easier to distinguish my species from regular cat-eared merpeople, please if you’re tagging this as reference, do not use it to draw your own purrmaid!! This specific combination of different design elements belong to me! (this is a closed species) That being said it’s /fine/ if you draw cat eared merpeople b/c that’s different that what i’ve laid out on this sheet!!

I’m wondering why on Earth it was put online if it’s a personal reference. It would’ve been easier just not to put it up and you’d make theft slightly more difficult. I have books full of design work etc. and trust me when I say those will never see the light of day unless I encourage people to learn from my work (not likely any time soon). On another note, referencing is not direct copy of a shown work or design and it’s substantially more likely for people to simply trace your existing works than inadvertantly plagiarise by using your sheet. Referencing actually requires talent where as the standard trace requires much less. It should be the least of your problems.

As I’ve stated before, if people put their work online it is a fact, however unsavoury, that someone will lift it for their own purposes so people need to be careful. Once something is online you can never get rid of it. If there’s something you’re keeping mum about then make sure it stays off the internet and especially off especially social media websites.
shounen-shoujos:

shounen-shoujos:

sort of a guideline to purrfolks uwu hopefully this will help with “originality” issues more info can be found here !!

hello!! just reblogging to add this tidbit because seeing people tag this as reference is a little nerve-wracking.. i drew this sheet so that it’s easier to distinguish my species from regular cat-eared merpeople, please if you’re tagging this as reference, do not use it to draw your own purrmaid!! This specific combination of different design elements belong to me! (this is a closed species) That being said it’s /fine/ if you draw cat eared merpeople b/c that’s different that what i’ve laid out on this sheet!!

I’m wondering why on Earth it was put online if it’s a personal reference. It would’ve been easier just not to put it up and you’d make theft slightly more difficult. I have books full of design work etc. and trust me when I say those will never see the light of day unless I encourage people to learn from my work (not likely any time soon). On another note, referencing is not direct copy of a shown work or design and it’s substantially more likely for people to simply trace your existing works than inadvertantly plagiarise by using your sheet. Referencing actually requires talent where as the standard trace requires much less. It should be the least of your problems.

As I’ve stated before, if people put their work online it is a fact, however unsavoury, that someone will lift it for their own purposes so people need to be careful. Once something is online you can never get rid of it. If there’s something you’re keeping mum about then make sure it stays off the internet and especially off especially social media websites.
shounen-shoujos:

shounen-shoujos:

sort of a guideline to purrfolks uwu hopefully this will help with “originality” issues more info can be found here !!

hello!! just reblogging to add this tidbit because seeing people tag this as reference is a little nerve-wracking.. i drew this sheet so that it’s easier to distinguish my species from regular cat-eared merpeople, please if you’re tagging this as reference, do not use it to draw your own purrmaid!! This specific combination of different design elements belong to me! (this is a closed species) That being said it’s /fine/ if you draw cat eared merpeople b/c that’s different that what i’ve laid out on this sheet!!

I’m wondering why on Earth it was put online if it’s a personal reference. It would’ve been easier just not to put it up and you’d make theft slightly more difficult. I have books full of design work etc. and trust me when I say those will never see the light of day unless I encourage people to learn from my work (not likely any time soon). On another note, referencing is not direct copy of a shown work or design and it’s substantially more likely for people to simply trace your existing works than inadvertantly plagiarise by using your sheet. Referencing actually requires talent where as the standard trace requires much less. It should be the least of your problems.

As I’ve stated before, if people put their work online it is a fact, however unsavoury, that someone will lift it for their own purposes so people need to be careful. Once something is online you can never get rid of it. If there’s something you’re keeping mum about then make sure it stays off the internet and especially off especially social media websites.

shounen-shoujos:

shounen-shoujos:

sort of a guideline to purrfolks uwu hopefully this will help with “originality” issues more info can be found here !!

hello!! just reblogging to add this tidbit because seeing people tag this as reference is a little nerve-wracking.. i drew this sheet so that it’s easier to distinguish my species from regular cat-eared merpeople, please if you’re tagging this as reference, do not use it to draw your own purrmaid!! This specific combination of different design elements belong to me! (this is a closed species) That being said it’s /fine/ if you draw cat eared merpeople b/c that’s different that what i’ve laid out on this sheet!!

I’m wondering why on Earth it was put online if it’s a personal reference. It would’ve been easier just not to put it up and you’d make theft slightly more difficult. I have books full of design work etc. and trust me when I say those will never see the light of day unless I encourage people to learn from my work (not likely any time soon). On another note, referencing is not direct copy of a shown work or design and it’s substantially more likely for people to simply trace your existing works than inadvertantly plagiarise by using your sheet. Referencing actually requires talent where as the standard trace requires much less. It should be the least of your problems.

As I’ve stated before, if people put their work online it is a fact, however unsavoury, that someone will lift it for their own purposes so people need to be careful. Once something is online you can never get rid of it. If there’s something you’re keeping mum about then make sure it stays off the internet and especially off especially social media websites.

eschergirls:

nadadoll:

figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956
figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

Hear hear. Don’t be afraid to give your characters “flaws” because they add to the uniqueness of the design and separate your characters from the generic template used in the industry. It also adds to the believability factor of the characters your design.
eschergirls:

nadadoll:

figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956
figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

Hear hear. Don’t be afraid to give your characters “flaws” because they add to the uniqueness of the design and separate your characters from the generic template used in the industry. It also adds to the believability factor of the characters your design.

eschergirls:

nadadoll:

figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956

figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

Hear hear. Don’t be afraid to give your characters “flaws” because they add to the uniqueness of the design and separate your characters from the generic template used in the industry. It also adds to the believability factor of the characters your design.

tooaya:

crabbyjammies:

bernardlblacks:

being friends with artists to get free drawings doesn’t even work!!!! i am an artist and i cant even give myself free drawings

Honestly if I tell you I’ll draw something for you there’s really only about 5% chance of me actually drawing it.

Most of the times if your artist friend wants to draw something for you they won’t even tell you.  You’ll just find a picture in your face one day with nice comments like HERE BITCH TAKE IT.

You’ll often get it after a day of strange nonsensical questions as they probe you for your likes and dislikes and no other warning.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

I'm only fourteen, thus not qualified to make this important decision in my life. I'm torn between becoming a Psychologist and an Artist. I love making art, and it is my passion. Sadly, I know it is very hard to make it big in that industry and it might be near impossible to gain a steady income from it. I think being a Psychologist would be nice, but it's not my ideal job. I don't really think I could do anything without getting that sort of job, but again, it's not really what I want to do.

artbymoga:

Stop right there. I want you to ask yourself this question:

"I money didn’t matter, what would I want to do for a living?"

See, no matter what, if you pursue your passion (in this case art) the money will ALWAYS follow. 

At the end of the day, would you rather be able to have a bunch of worthless bills, or know you spent your life doing what you love most?

If you’re looking at careers this is an important thing to consider.  Artists aren’t known to make a lot of cash, but there’s other considerations for people to take into account as well. 

The main thing to consider is that you don’t really need art school or art degree qualifications to be an artist. When you work in the industry your main item which will get you jobs is a portfolio of your artworks, not a resume saying you went to art school “X”. Your client generally doesn’t care if you attended an art school, but they will be interested in the quality of your art which is shown in your portfolio. Your portfolio speaks louder than your degree, especially if the degree happens to be taught by people who have grounding in theory than in practice. If you’re looking into illustration or design for larger companies then their requirements might include a desire for experience on high profile projects. Very rarely have I seen requirements for a Bachelor of Fine Arts or Design in a job description. Those only tend to be required if you become a gallery curator and that’s not a popular career option as far as I’m aware. So not doing an art degree really shouldn’t be a problem if it’s a matter of expense and cost. This might be a little different in Europe but America generally doesn’t care about tertiary qualifications as far as I’m aware.

I’m mostly self taught and if you can find someone who gives honest feedback and knows what you’re doing then self teaching a  viable option. I’ve been drawing/painting for about 3 years now, so I’m not what you’d call naturally talented. With plenty of free online resources and even books you can hunt down on the internet it’s not an impossible thing to do with some dedication. As it is most formal art schools dedicate more time to art history and theory than teaching you practical basics perspective, anatomy, colour theory, composition and the like. So the more formal art schools tend to be a waste of time if you’re only attending to learn practical skills. As an artist, I’m only in it for pratical work and personally I really couldn’t care less about art history.

Speaking from personal experience, I’m a Law/Creative Arts student but the Creative Arts course offered by my university isn’t one that dedicates all that much time to practical work. I feel like I’m wasting my time by even doing Creative Arts as I’m not learning anything practical or useful for industry work.  As a result I’m dropping the Creative Arts portion of my degree, heading into straight Law so I can better my understanding of law. As for art I’ll continue to self teach with some help from friends like Dave. Maybe after my degree finishes I might consider attending a one year practical course at one of more hands on technical colleges where I live because they’re said to have excellent courses that are nowhere near as expensive as university and are more suited to my purpose. A year of excellent practical education is far more useful than 4 year of substandard practical education. So if people want to do Psychology/Commerce/Business/Medicine/Law etc. then there’s nothing stopping you from doing that and learning art on the side or at a later date. There’s no reason as to why someone can’t do both, especially with formal art schools being so overrated.

I do disagree with the comment on “worthless bills” because those things can easily ruin your entire life if they aren’t handled adequately. Be sensible about your career choice and always have a backup because you don’t want to end up bankrupting yourself because you’re too dedicated to your pursuit of art. In the case of the example  above, there’s no reason as to why they can’t have Psychology as a backup while they learn art themselves or through someone else. So be sensible about these things, because it’s sadly not as simple as loving something enough.

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